Thermographs - Data Information

List of stations

The stations included in the permanent thermograph network are selected through a process involving numerous consultations. The program aims to cover all coastal and offshore areas of the estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence using a minimum of stations. Good spatial and temporal coverage should permit the creation of a climatology atlas for this zone while also meeting shorter-term needs for this type of data.

Lower St. Lawrence / Gaspésie

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Bic
Three thermographs record water temperature at depths of 1, 2, and 30.5 metres.

The Bic Islands station in the Lower St. Lawrence region is one of the stations used to evaluate the quality of satellite images. Three thermographs attached to a Canadian Coast Guard buoy (or near its anchor) record water temperature at half-hour intervals during the summer and fall.
Bic48° 19.951′ N
69° 00.918′ W
30.51.0, 2.0, 30.5
Rimouski
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 0.5 and 312 metres.

The buoy at Rimouski station is equipped with sensors measuring metorological, ocenographic and optical parameter. The data acquisition is made only during summer and automn due to ice cover. We only present here temperature and salinity data.
Rimouski48° 40.000′ N
68° 35.000′ W
330.00.5, 330.0
Maurice Lamontagne Institute
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 0.5 and 15 metres.

Temperature readings are taken near the seawater intake of the Maurice Lamontagne Institute, at the western boundary of the Gaspé Peninsula. The seawater intake, which supplies seawater for this research facility, is situated at a depth of nearly 15 metres. As is the case for most stations in the network, temperature is also recorded near the surface (at a depth of about 50 centimeters). Continuous recording is done only in summer and fall.
MLI-3 – A48° 39.600′ N
68° 09.390′ W
15.00.5, 15.0
MLI-3 – B48° 39.520′ N
68° 09.390′ W
15.015.0
Grande-Rivière
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 2 and 10 metres.

Temperature data from Grande Rivière in the Gaspé region may be used in research on certain pelagic species like herring. One thermograph is installed on a Canadian Coast Guard buoy; another is located near the buoy anchor, at a depth of about 10 metres. These instruments record water temperature at half-hour intervals during the summer and fall.
Grande-Rivière48° 23.330′ N
64° 29.527′ W
10.00.5, 2.0, 10.0
Gaspé Current
Gaspé Current49° 14.500′ N
66° 12.000′ W
165.00.5, 165.0

Québec’s North Shore

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Baie-Comeau
Two thermographs record temperature at depths of 1 and 82.3 metres.

A thermograph has been installed on a Coast Guard buoy while another thermograph is near the anchor at 82 metres depth.
Baie-Comeau49° 12.069′ N
68° 03.351′ W
82.31.0, 82.3
Sept-Îles
Three thermographs record temperature at depths of 1, 2 and 21.9 metres.

The Sept Îles site is representative of the North Shore regions where upwelling of cold waters occurs. The thermographs are installed on a Canadian Coast Guard buoy near the surface and near the buoy anchor at a depth of 22 metres.
Sept-Îles50° 10.286′ N
66° 25.764′ W
21.91.0, 2.0, 21.9
Rivière au Tonnerre
Two thermographs record water temperature at a depth of 1 and 16 metres.

Studies on the Stimpson’s surf clam led to the monitoring of waters in this area. No data are available for near-surface temperatures; however, data are available from a thermograph situated near the anchor of a Canadian Coast Guard buoy, at a depth of 16 metres.
Rivière-au-Tonnerre50° 15.827′ N
64° 46.792′ W
16.01.0, 16.0
Havre-Saint-Pierre
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 2 and 120 metres.

The Havre St. Pierre station is one of the stations used to access the quality of satellite images. Two thermographs are installed on an ODAS (Ocean Data Acquisition System) scientific buoy during the ice-free season. One of them is situated at a depth of 120 metres, near the buoy anchor and the other is installed on the buoy near the surface water.
Havre-Saint-Pierre50° 06.504′ N
63° 38.459′ W
120.00.5, 1.0, 2.0, 120.0
Natashquan
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 1 and 5.4 metres.

Two thermographs are installed on a Canadian Coast Guard buoy, but only during the summer and fall. The deepest one is placed near the buoy anchor, at a depth of less than 6 metres.

Discussion
The mean temperature between May and October was very similar in 1994 and 1995, ranging within a tenth of a degree of 10.8 ºC. However, the mean temperature between May 25 and June 21 1995 was 3 ºC higher than in 1994, indicating that the North Shore experienced a milder spring in 1995 than in 1994. The daily means exibit even greater variability: on some days the water temperature was nearly 15 ºC warmer or colder than on the same date a year earlier. This substantial variability in surface water temperature at Natashquan is likely due to episodic nature of the wind-induced upwelling of coastal water. Based on the monthly means, however, the difference between temperatures in 1994 and 1995 was less than 1 ºC.
Natashquan50° 11.204′ N
61° 50.672′ W
5.41.0, 5.4
La Romaine
Three thermographs record water temperature at depths of 1, 2, and 21.9 metres.
At the La Romaine site on the Lower North Shore, the thermographs are attached to a Canadian Coast Guard buoy. The deepest thermograph is situated near the buoy anchor at a depth of about 22 metres. Data collected near the surface can be used to evaluate the quality of satellite images.
La Romaine50° 07.306′ N
60° 18.581′ W
21.91.0, 2.0, 21.9
La Tabatière
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 1 and 39 metres.

Two thermographs are installed on a Canadian Coast Guard buoy, but only during the summer and fall. The deepest one is placed near the buoy anchor, at a depth of less than 39 metres.

Note: This station has been added to the Thermograph Network in 2002.
La Tabatière50° 51.203′ N
58° 57.014′ W
39.01.0, 39.0
Blanc-Sablon
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 1 and 36 metres.

Blanc Sablon station is the northernmost station of thermograph network. One thermograph is installed on the Coast Guard buoy while another thermograph is near the anchor at 22 metre depth.
Blanc-Sablon51° 23.972′ N
57° 11.647′ W
22.01.0, 22.0
Belle-Isle
One thermograph record water temperature at depth of 105 metres.

Belle-Isle station is equipped with a thermograph near bottom measuring seawater temperature in continous. Du to ice that are present most of the year no instrumment is at surface. The water depth is about 110 metres while the instrument is 5 metres from bottom.
Belle-Isle – A51° 21.100′ N
56° 52.500′ W
111.0105.0Monitored from 2004 to 2006
Belle-Isle – B51° 34.800′ N
56° 37.200′ W
75.071.0Monitored since 2007

Estuary / Anticosti Island

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Mont-Louis
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 0.5 and 30 metres

In spite of what its name suggests, this station is located in the middle of the estuary. One thermograph is installed just below the water surface on an Environment Canada weather buoy used for atmospheric measurements. Another thermograph at a depth of 30 metres is also operational. The buoy is anchored in water more than 300 metres deep. Water temperature is measured continuously, but only during the summer and fall.
Mont-Louis49° 32.598′ N
65° 45.583′ W
325.00.35, 0.50, 1.1, 2.1, 30.0, 200.0
Port-Menier
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 2 and 12.8 metres.

The Port Menier station operates using a Canadian Coast Guard buoy located near Anticosti Island. Two thermographs, one attached near the surface and the other near the buoy anchor, at a depth of 13 metres, record water temperature every half hour during the summer and fall.
Port-Menier49° 46.225′ N
64° 20.621′ W
12.82.0, 12.8
Anticosti Gyre
Anticosti Gyre49° 43.000′ N
66° 15.000′ W
337.00.5, 337.0This station is no longer monitored since 2012

Saguenay Fjord

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Tadoussac
Two thermographs record temperature et depths of 2 and 36.6 metres.

For several years, many stakeholders have been involved in creating a marine park in the Saguenay Fjord. Once this happens, this environment, which has already been researched extensively, is likely to receive even more attention. Some studies have called for monitoring of water temperature over a number of years. Thermographs attached to a Canadian Coast Guard buoy (or near the anchor) record water temperature every half hour during the summer and fall.
Tadoussac48° 07.185′ N
69° 40.503′ W
36.61.0, 2.0, 36.6

North-East Gulf

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Banc Beaugé
Three thermographs record water temperature at depths of 0.5, 1 and 97 metres.

Banc Beaugé station is located in the North-East of St. Lawrence Gulf. The ODAS buoy is installed by the Canadian Coast Guard. The temperature measured at this station are used for calibrating satellite image of sea surface temperature. One thermograph is installed directly on the buoy at 1 metre. Another thermograph near the buoy anchor measure temperature at a depth of about 97 metres. During summer and automn temperature are measured each 30 minutes.
Banc Beaugé49° 30.077′ N
60° 03.984′ W
97.00.5, 1.0, 97.0
Old Harry
Old Harry48° 00′ N
60° 30.0′ W
457.00.5Note that these data are not released

Prince Edouard Island

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Borden
A thermograph records water temperature at a depth of 3.5 metres.
This station also collects winter data.

A lengthly time series is already available for Borden on Prince Edward Island. This is one of the few stations where temperatures have been recorded in winter as well as summer. The thermographs are installed in a PVC cylinder attached to the public wharf at Borden. One was located 50 centimeters below the surface (it was taken out of service in 1996); the other is on the seabed, at a depth of 3 metres. Year after year, this station exhibits the highest mean monthly temperature in the entire thermograph network. Northumberland Strait therefore represents the warmest region in the Gulf of St. Lawrence during the summer.
Borden46° 14.964′ N
63° 42.060′ W
1.01.0

Magdelen Islands

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Île Shag
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 1 and 10 metres.
This station also collects winter data at a depth of 10 metres.

The temperature readings taken at Shag Island in the Magdalen Islands are considered essential for biological studies on such topics as lobster growth, moulting, and reproduction. They are also used to analyse fishing yields. A local fisher installs the two thermographs every summer at depths of 1 metres and 10 metres.
Shag Island47° 28.510′ N
61° 41.300′ W
10.01.0, 10.0
La Perle
Two thermographs record water temperature at a depth of 1 and 26 metres.

The La Perle staion in the Magdalen Islands is one of the stations used to evaluate the quality of satellite images. A surface thermograph installed on the Pearl Reef buoy is operational during the summer and fall. In 1997, a second thermograph has been installed near the buoy anchor at a depth of 26 metres.
La Perle47° 19.470′ N
61° 34.307′ W
26.01.0, 26.0

Southern Gulf

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Irving Whale
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 1 and 67 metres.

Irving Whale station is located in the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence. The temperature measured at this site are used for calibrating satellite image of sea surface temperature. A thermograph is installed directly on the ODAS buoy while another thermograph mesure seawater temperature near the anchor buoy. The buoy is installed and recovered by the Canadian Coast Guard.
Irving Whale47° 24.200′ N
63° 23.530′ W
67.00.5, 1.0, 67.0
Shediac
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 0.5 and 82 metres.

Shediac station is located in the Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence and made part of Atlantic Zone Monitoring Program (AZMP). An oceanographic buoy measuring oceanographic, meteorologic and optical data is installed at this station during free ice season. The temperature measured at this site are used for calibrating satellite image of sea surface temperature.
Shediac47° 47.000′ N
64° 02.000′ W
82.00.5, 82.0

Newfoundland

NamePosition (lat, long)Depth (m)Immersion depths thermographs (m)Comments
Bonne Bay
Two thermographs record water temperature at depths of 1 and 25 metres.
This station also collects winter data at a depth of 25 metres.

Satellite images of the sea surface temperature in this region, along with wind measurements, indicate that the Bonne Bay site is representative of the upwellings and downwellings of cold water that occur there. In addition, observations have shown that large concentrations of herring are present here during the fall,. A local resident installs the thermographs at depths of 1 metre and 25 metres (on the bottom).

Note: We have impose an embargo on data recorded at 25 metres due to possible problem with instrument position.
Bonne Bay49° 32.300′ N
57° 56.000′ W
25.00.5, 25.0This station is no longer monitored since 2005